Submission Guidelines

PLEASE READ THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES IN ITS ENTIRETY. FAILURE TO ADHERE TO ALL POLICIES MAY LEAD TO ARTICLE REJECTION.

Deadlines

Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis throughout the year. The Tower publishes two volumes per year. Due to the review and production process, for submissions to be considered for each issue they must be submitted before the publicized deadline, which can be found at gttower.org. Submissions received after this deadline will be considered for the following issue. If the quality of their submission were to be compromised to meet the deadline, authors are encouraged to further develop their work and only submit it once it is fully realized.

Eligibility

Submitters must be enrolled as undergraduate students at the Georgia Institute of Technology to be eligible for consideration. Authors have up to six months after graduation to submit papers regarding research completed as an undergraduate.

Multiple authors

Undergraduates must be the primary authors of all submissions. Graduate students or faculty may have been involved in the research only if they acted as mentors rather than as full-time collaborators. Multiple authors on a submission are acceptable, as long as the primary author is an undergraduate student at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Multiple submissions

Multiple manuscripts from the same author will be considered, but each should be submitted separately. The author must provide a separate consent form for each manuscript submitted, but is not required to provide a separate author biography.

Simultaneous submissions

Simultaneous submissions with other publications is discouraged, but may be considered if within the policies of the other journal. If a submitted manuscript has been submitted to another journal for simultaneous consideration, this fact must be clearly indicated on the consent form. It is the author's responsibility to notify The Tower immediately upon a paper's acceptance elsewhere. Submissions published in The Tower may be reprinted in another publication, as long as The Tower is credited.

Submission Types

The following formatting requirements are specific for the type of submission. When submitting, authors must indicate one of the following submission types for their manuscript.

Articles

The longest and most in-depth of the submission types, articles represent the culmination point of an undergraduate research project, where the author addresses a clearly defined research problem from one, or sometimes multiple approaches. An article should:

  • present a research problem, defining all concepts needed to understand the problem and its implications;

  • present the motivation behind the study;

  • explain with detail the research method;

  • present the study's results and analyze them;

  • and discuss future work and draw any valid conclusions, all in context of the overall purpose of the study and its theoretical implications.

A properly formatted article must:

  • be between 1500 and 3000 words (not including title page, abstract, and references)--exceptions are granted with expressed approval from the current Editor-in-Chief;

  • include an abstract of 250 words or less that explains the motivation of the study, the findings, and the conclusions;

  • have at least five cited references from peer-reviewed scholarly articles;

  • and have at least the following sections:

    • For submissions from the College of Computing, Sciences, Engineering, and Architecture papers must follow the following format:

      • Introduction / Background Information: define all terminology, theories and concepts unfamiliar to a reader from outside your discipline, introduce the motivation for this research and the hypotheses to be tested all supported by properly cited references

      • Methods/Procedures/Materials: explain and justify research method

      • Results: present findings and data objectively

      • Discussion / Analysis: explain trend, implications and possible causes of the results

      • Future work: describe unfulfilled objectives and present future research necessary to better understand the phenomena

      • References: see section below titled "References"

      • Acknowledgements: if your work received any funding, e.g. NSF, NIH, or PURA grants, these sources must be acknowledged as well as collaborators, faculty or graduate student mentors

    • For submissions from the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts and the College of Management the author may format article as presented above or in the following fashion:

      • Introduction / Background Information: propose thesis and define all terminology, theories and concepts unfamiliar to a reader from outside of the author's discipline; introduce the motivation for the research and the hypotheses to be tested all supported by properly cited references

      • Supporting body paragraphs: established thesis must be supported by field-appropriate evidence. Explain trend, implications and possible causes of the results

      • Discussion / Conclusion: discuss the conclusions of the supporting body paragraphs and its implications, without introducing new data/results/material

      • Future work: describe unfulfilled objectives and present future research necessary to better understand the phenomena

      • References: see section below titled "References," (DO NOT title this section "Works Cited")

      • Acknowledgements: if your work received any funding, e.g. NSF, NIH, or PURA grants, these sources must be acknowledged as well as collaborators, faculty or graduate student mentors

Some questions an article should answer:

  • What problem is being addressed?

  • Why is it important to solve this problem?

  • What is the motivation or rationale of the study?

  • What is the hypothesis?

  • How will the hypothesis be tested?

  • How does this method differ from other research?

  • What is the research method? Provide as much detail as possible.

  • What are the results of the research?

  • What are the trends and implications of the results?

  • How do the result address the research problem?

  • How can the research be improved upon?

  • What are the theoretical implications of the research? What is the big picture?

  • What conclusions can be drawn by the research? These must be well supported.

Dispatches

A submission type that is narrower in scope than an article, but by no means lower in quality. Aimed at undergraduates earlier in their research career, the dispatch should report recent progress on a research challenge, no matter how minor the result may seem to the technical field at-large, as long as the result is supported with scientific rigor, and the author shows good awareness of the greater picture.

A dispatch should:

  • not be more than 1500 words (not including title page and references);

  • include an abstract of 250 words or less that explains the motivation of the study, the findings, and the conclusions;

  • and follow the formatting standards for Articles.

Perspectives

A submission type not based on primary data but rather active scholarly thinking in which the author invites further discussions on a topic of interest through literature synthesis and/or logical analysis. By nature, undergraduate researchers tend to be futuristic and perspectives encourages all Georgia Tech students to explore the profound impacts of achievements in their disciplines on society.

A perspective should:

  • not be more than 1500 words (not including title page and references);

  • have at least 3 properly cited references;

  • open-ended format, but must include the following:

    • Introduction / Background Information: must propose thesis and define all terminology, theories and concepts unfamiliar to a reader from outside your discipline. Introduce the motivation for the paper and its significance in the field

    • Supporting body paragraphs: established thesis must be supported by field-appropriate evidence in the literature. Explain trends, implications and possible causes of the results

    • Discussion / Conclusion: must discuss the conclusions of the supporting body paragraphs and its implications, without introducing new data/results/material

    • References: see section below titled "References," (DO NOT title this section "Works Cited")

  • address the following questions:

    • Why is the topic important?

    • What are the implications (scientific, economic, cultural, etc.) of the topic or problem?

    • What is known about this topic?

    • What is not known about this issue?

    • What are possible methods to address this issue?

Synopsis Article

A submission type that provides a detailed overview of a research article that has already been published (must specifically say the Synopsis article is based off of a published article). The author must be a co-author on the original paper, and must have the expressed permission of ALL authors of the original paper through our Consent Form

A synopsis article should:

  • not be more than 1500 words (not including title page and references);

  • have at least 3 properly cited references

  • adhere to the same article format as Articles and Dispatches;

  • address the following questions:

  • Why is the topic important?

  • What are the implications (scientific, economic, cultural, etc.) of the topic or problem?

  • What is known about this topic?

  • What is not known about this issue?

  • What are possible methods to address this issue?

General Submission Requirements

The following formatting requirements apply to all types of submissions. They must all be satisfied before a submission will be reviewed.

All papers must:

  • adhere to one of the following three citation formats throughout the manuscript:

    • APA formatting guidelines as specified in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed. (Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2006);

    • MLA formatting guidelines as specified in the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed. (Washington, DC: Modern Language Association of America, 2009);

    • Chicago formatting guidelines as specified in the The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010);

  • be submitted in Microsoft Word format;

  • be set in 12-point Times New Roman font, double-spaced;

  • not include identifying information (name, professor, department) in the text, reference section, or on the title page. Papers will be tracked by special software that will keep author information separate from the paper itself;

  • be written in standard U.S. English and utilize standard scientific nomenclature — define new terms, abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols at their first occurrence;

  • acknowledge any funding, collaborators and mentors;

  • not use footnotes -- if footnotes are absolutely necessary to the integrity of the paper, please contact the Managing Editor of Submissions and Review at review@gttower.org;

  • reference all tables, figures, and references within the text of the document;

  • absolutely no copyrighted material, such as figures and images, within the body of the paper without expressed permission from the owner;

  • adhere to the Georgia Institute of Technology honor code regarding plagiarism and proper referencing of sources;

  • and keep direct quotations to an absolute minimum -- paraphrase unless a direct quote is absolutely necessary.

References

List references in APA, MLA, or Chicago format at the end of the document, and have a citation for every reference listed within the text, and a reference listed for every citation. References should be listed alphabetically by author, and should be cited within the text using the author last name and year. For example:

The Tower undergraduate research journal published its first issue in fall of 2008 (Smith, 2008).

According to Smith (2008), The Tower undergraduate research journal published its first issue in fall of 2008.

For more information, including other citation formats and examples, refer to OWL at Purdue or other online APA resources. Reference formatting is easily accomplished by using Endnote software, which is available for free download from OIT. The Georgia Tech Library periodically holds free training workshops for Endnote, and all individuals planning to write research papers should consider learning the software. A key benefit of using the software is that references will be automatically formatted to any style specified.

Figures and Illustrations

Figures and illustrations should be submitted as separate, high resolution image files to OJS. Captions for each figure/illustration should be included before the references in the manuscript document. Each figure and illustration requires a caption in the format of:

Figure 1. The relationship between concentrations of photoinitiator and polymerization time.

Acceptable formats for figures and illustrations include: JPEG, GIF, PNG, BMP, and TIFF (preferred). Graphs and images with text or sharp lines should be submitted using GIF, PNG, or TIFF (and not JPEG), to preserve image quality. Images should be at least 4 inches wide. Larger images with maximum resolutions are preferred. All monochrome images (line art) must be at least 1000 dpi in resolution, all combination halftone images (color with type) must be at least 600 dpi, and all halftones (color without type) must be at least 300 dpi. If images are not of high enough resolution, articles (even accepted) will be withheld from publication. During the production stage, the Managing Editor for Production may be in contact to make suggested or necessary modifications to graphics. Please keep an editable copy of each figure and illustration secure and available for this purpose.

Sound and Video

The Tower accepts sound and video files that greatly enhance a submission. Sound files should be submitted in MP3 format, and videos in MPG or MP4. These files may be included in online media.

Tables

Tables should be submitted in Microsoft Word or Excel. They may either be included with the submission text, or as separate files. When appropriate, table columns should have descriptive headings. Number tables in order of appearance. Like images or graphs, they must be accompanied by appropriate caption text:

Table 2. Number of testing subjects included in each cohort.

Equations

Equations must be submitted in Microsoft Equation Editor (unfortunately, we cannot accept LaTeX formats) within the manuscript text. Do not submit equations as image files. Equations do not require captions, but clearly identify all variables within equations upon their first appearance. Equations should be numbered in order of appearance, and can be referenced within the text by number:

The relationship between the three sides of a right triangle is evident from Equation 3:

a2 + b2 = c2           (3)

where, a and b are the two shorter sides of a right triangle, and c is the hypotenuse.

Acknowledgments

An acknowledgments paragraph should be included as a separate Word document, as it contains identifying information. If your work received any funding, e.g. NSF, NIH, or PURA grants, these sources must be acknowledged. Collaborators, as well as faculty or graduate student mentors, should also be acknowledged.